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Don, (from Latin Dominus, roughly 'Lord'), is an honorific prefix primarily used in Spain, Italy, Portugal, Latin America, Croatia, Goa, and the Philippines.

Don, and dom, is derived from the Latin Dominus: a master of a household, a title with background from the Roman Republic in classical antiquity. With the abbreviated form having emerged as such in the Middle Ages, traditionally it is reserved for Catholic clergy and nobles, in addition to certain educational authorities and persons of distinction.

Although originally a title reserved for royalty, select nobles, and church hierarchs, it is now often used as a mark of esteem for a person of personal, social or official distinction, such as a community leader of long standing, a person of significant wealth, or a noble, but may also be used ironically. As a style, rather than a title or rank, it is used with, rather than in place of, a person's name.

In North America, Don has also been made popular by films depicting the Mafia, such as The Godfather series, where the crime boss is given by his associates the same signs of respect that were traditionally granted in Italy to nobility. However, the honorific followed by the last name (e.g. Don Corleone, Don Barzini, etc.) would be used in Italy for priests only: the proper Italian respectful form ("Don Firstname") is similar to the Castilian Spanish form. This title has in turn been applied by the media to real-world Mafia figures, such as the nickname "Teflon Don" for John Gotti.

In Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul, the title is a show of respect and recognition of authority towards high-ranking cartel bosses such as Hector Salamanca, Juan Bolsa, Lalo Salamanca and Eladio Vuente.

In one scene Gus mistakenly refers to Hector as "Don Salamanca" ("I.F.T."). This could be seen either as a writing mistake or the character intentionally mishandling his title.

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